Concepts in a Post-COVID World; Online Brand to Retail Space

The impact of COVID-19 tunnelled under constructed society. It pulled it up by the tail and uprooted; claiming businesses, family life and connection like an unmuffled Mandrake. Amongst the hardest hit was the retail sector, and more specifically – the UK High Street.

As the realm of Marketing is continually redefined by Influencers, and our transience held captive by 60 second videos, what purpose can Retail serve now?

“The UK high street is increasingly a fragile house of cards that suffers from a concentration of ownership, insufficient investment to keep pace with online developments, and a general lack of dynamism and engagement between brands & consumers.”

Dr Gordon Fletcher*

Re-Tail

As they say, first, lets “make heads or tails of it”

Empty Storefront
LINK IN SIDE NOTES

In today’s order of things, solid bricks and mortar constructed space is playing a role of emulating or continuing the experience of a brand.

Optimism says the High Street will regain value, but as a ‘new’ and reinvented phenomena. As someone that lived off Gloucester Road in Bristol, the UK’s longest stretch of independent retailers, for about 4 years – it’s a soft spot. I think that community spirit is something that we look for in our sense of place. But enough about me.

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OK But, How Do We Build & Engage with a Brand anyway?

Given that now there are many brands that have begun online, I’m going to look at this in that order, so in a sense we’re working from the end to get back to the beginning.

Re-Phrase

“How do we translate our online engagement into a physically built space?”

To really get into this, elements of Urban Economy comes in – but for visual appeal I’ve decided to use a friends jewellery brand as a case study to develop a Retail Experience Strategy. With the fact it started on Instagram its important to inject ‘her

(aesthetic + voice * value = brand)

As a creator into retail space, we really need to ensure a fluency from online to physical space so her retail concept extends her online presence. People want to feel like they’ve recognised the voice and maintain that sense of friendship that’s constructed online, particularly now when most of our social interactions have been metaphysical.

Cue Materials

SIDE NOTES

BRINKWORTH Featured image with The Mighty Might + Four One Four for Selfridges Menswear. Read on DESIGN CURIAL

Quoted article by Hannah Finch for BusinessLive, Dec 2020.

[appear here] The Little Black Boutique – Columbia Road, Shoreditch

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